Truths Behind Coronary Artery Disease Prevention Myths

Myths & Facts about Heart Disease For decades, our public health system, healthcare providers and media have touted that lifestyle behaviors like a high-fat diet and elevated cholesterol levels can lead to  coronary artery disease, raising the risk of a heart attack or stroke. However, recent studies have ignited debates between experts as to what really contributes to heart disease. Below are three questionable prevention tactics and the truth behind them. 

MYTH:  Diet High in Saturated Fat - Foods high in saturated fats, like dairy products, red meat and hydrogenated oils were universally considered artery-clogging until the authors of two recent studies suggested that these foods are not the real cause of heart disease. 

TRUTH:  Having some saturated fat in your diet is not unhealthy; in fact, foods that are considered heart healthy, such as nuts, avocados and olive oils, contain saturated fat. And saturated fats are certainly better for you than processed or chemically engineered fats like Trans fats or even many low-fat products available. The fact is, you should limit the amount of saturated fat in your diet and be selective of the sources of fat. You can learn more about saturated fat and heart health from MDVIP Connect


MYTH: Lifestyle Behavior – People who live a sedentary lifestyle, eat processed foods, smoke and struggle controlling weight and stress have a higher risk of developing coronary artery disease compared to those who do not engage in these lifestyle behaviors. 

TRUTH: Lifestyle does play a major role in coronary artery disease but the root of the problem isn’t the behavior; it is the immune system. Studies suggest that inflammation is a primary culprit in cardiovascular disease. Inflammation is an immune system response to an irritant. As soon as you prick your finger or come in contact with an allergen or catch a cold, your immune system activates, sending an army of white blood cells to fight off “foreign invaders” like bacteria, allergens and viruses. Even injuries like a sprained ankle, tennis elbow and tendinitis cause inflammation as white blood cells flood injured areas to remove bacteria and dead cellular debris. Sometimes inflammation is noticeable (redness and swelling that appears in an injured area); this is referred to as acute inflammation. Chronic inflammation, however, occurs on a deeper, more internal level and is usually invisible, leaving us unaware that an underlying, potentially dangerous health issue like heart disease may be brewing.

Diet can also promote inflammation that can lead to heart disease. For example, eating refined foods like white flour products, sugary foods and drinks, and fried foods can raise blood sugar levels, triggering proteins called cytokines to send inflammatory messages to the immune system. Further, excessive alcohol consumption can raise the level of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation in the body.


MYTH:   Elevated Cholesterol Level - For years, experts have preached that keeping cholesterol levels under 200 and having a high HDL (good cholesterol) is a key component of heart disease prevention.  

TRUTH: Although a high LDL level (bad cholesterol) is a reliable predictor of heart disease, studies suggest that only half of those who suffer from a heart attack had elevated LDLs. Recent research revealed that LDL particles come in different sizes. Larger particles are relatively harmless, while smaller particles can cause damage as it is easier for them to slide through the lining of arteries. Smaller particles also tend to oxidize easier than larger particles. Oxidation occurs when oxygen is metabolized. The process creates a by-product known as free radicals, which steal electrons from other molecules, damaging cells, blood fats and DNA. Oxidation deteriorates our bodies and has been linked with cardiovascular disease, liver conditions and some cancers. Foods high in antioxidants like vitamin C, E and beta-carotene can protect our bodies and offset some of the damage caused by oxidation and free radicals.

Staying current with standard cardiovascular disease screenings and tests can help you manage your heart health. And adding the advanced panel of tests included in MDVIP's Wellness Program help determine your risk for coronary artery disease more accurately than simply tracking lifestyle behaviors and relying on cholesterol levels. MDVIP-affiliated physicians have the time and tools to look deep into heart disease risk and prevention strategies. To find an MDVIP physician near you, continue reading >> 

26 Comments
Paul Glenn
Feb 11th, 2016
none
Casey
Feb 10th, 2016
Your blog and referred articles note many causes of inflammation. If my lifestyle has inflammatory characteristics (such as the weight training example from another reader, and endurance training) as long as my CRP numbers are ok, does that mean that activity is not resulting in inflammation, or can the inflammation "hide" from the test?
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 11th, 2016
Greetings Casey,

One of the few lifestyle behaviors that helps reduce inflammation is exercise. After working out, there is a temporary elevation of clinically insignificant inflammation until the body repairs itself, which ultimately lowers inflammation. Exercise can be a problematic when it is excessive in nature. To the best of our knowledge, the purpose of a C-reactive protein test is to find the inflammation in your body; the inflammation cannot hide from a CRP test. Reading this Healthline article on C-reactive protein tests may provide you with more information: http://www.healthline.com/health/c-reactive-protein#Overview1

In Good Health,
MDVIP


Marcus Brown
Feb 8th, 2016
Genetics, following instructions of my MDVip (I take my One-A-Day and another pill), a good two-egg breakfast, eating everything I have always eaten, and reducing my exercise level, have all probably helped me to enjoy good health. It's gotten me to an active age 88. Perhaps a main factor is the thought behind a quote of Mark Twain's: "Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint."
Martin West
Aug 30th, 2015
The email notice for this post says:

"Over the last decade, the cornerstone tactics of coronary artery disease prevention like limiting saturated fats, avoiding gluten and controlling cholesterol levels have come into question."

The blog above does not discuss gluten at all. Avoiding gluten has never been a cornerstone of CAD prevention advice from my MDVIP doctor or the Berkeley Wellness Letter that I have read for over 25 year. Was something lost in translation?

In the last 5-10 years the theory that gluten is responsible for a number of health problems besides celiac disease has been popular with doctors with talk shows & books on the best seller lists, and in the popular media. My search of the current medical literature found lots of active research on the effects of gluten in the diet and non celiac gluten sensitivity, but certainly no consensus on the benefits, to the general population, of a gluten free diet.
Mary
Feb 24th, 2015
What is C-reactive protein and the normal range. I know it measures how sticky or thick your cholesterol is but am really confused !!
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 26th, 2015
Greetings Mary,

Thank you for writing in and asking about C-reactive protein. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a substance produced by the liver. CPR levels rise when our bodies become inflamed as a result of injury or illness. Because CRP is an effective indicator of inflammation and if some sort of disease is occurring in our bodies, there is a blood test for it. To learn more about C-reactive protein, tests for it and results, please read this article from Mayo Clinic - the link is pasted in below. You may also want to consider scheduling an appointment with your MDVIP-affiliated physician for more details on the appropriate CPR levels for you.

http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/c-reactive-protein/basics/definition/prc-20014480

In Good Health,
MDVIP

Mike
Feb 24th, 2015
Your article states that inflammation is bad and exercise is good. In addition to walking every day I work out with weight resistance equipment three times a week. I've heard that weight lifting tears down muscle which is rebuilt more strongly during days between exercise. That I view as a form of inflammation so are weight resistance exercises detrimental?

Speaking of inflammation, my wife took the anti-inflammation drug, Arthrotec for osteoarthritis in her knees. She developed pancreatitis. Medical personnel thought this drug might be causing it so she eliminated the drug and has experienced no more problems. So in this case it appears that inflammation reduction was not good.
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 26th, 2015
Greetings Mike,

We appreciate you asking about how inflammation affects our bodies. Actually, there are different types of inflammation - acute, basically meaning 'immediate' and chronic, basically meaning 'over time'. When you overload your muscles during weight training, it will cause micro-tears in that trigger the immune system to release hormones to grow and repair the muscle tissue. It is this rebuilding of the muscle tissue that develops and strengthens your muscles. The process can cause acute inflammation, which usually is a part of a healthy immune system. To control inflammation, make sure you are lifting weights with proper technique and resting in between workouts. Working out too often and too hard can lead to overtraining syndrome, resulting in fatigue and inflammation. Although chronic inflammation is associated with disease, studies have found that individuals who exercise have lower levels of inflammation. If you are questioning how much exercise, intensity level and types of activities are most appropriate for you, consider talking to your MDVIP-affiliate physician. As for your wife, it is in her best interest to have her discuss drug interactions with her own doctor.

In Good Health,
MDVIP

Mike
Feb 24th, 2015
Your article concerning myths and truths about heart disease was informative. Your article indicates that saturated fat is not quite so bad as once believed. The wife of my doctor, also a nurse, said I should eat an egg no more than once a week. I'm in generally good health and my doctor said I'm one of his healthiest patients. So then I read your article then note that diets promoted by the author of "Grain Brain" are rich in eggs. So what's the real story about eggs?
1 Reply
Kurt
Feb 26th, 2015
Greetings Mike,

We appreciate your questions about saturated fat as it can be a bit confusing concerning overall health, especially heart health. Keep in mind that we are actually promoting a heart-healthy diet, which involves limiting saturated fat. However, from our point of view, there are some healthy sources of saturated fat and that they are certainly a better choice than trans fats. As for eggs, whether or not to include them in your diet can be especially confusing. Eggs contain carotenoids like lutein and zeaxanthin that help maintain vision and brain function, and are a complete source of protein. However, the amount of cholesterol they have can be an issue for people trying to manage their cholesterol. Although this article - the link is pasted in below - from Cleveland Clinic provides more information about eggs, it is always best to discuss dietary concerns, particularly those pertaining to your heart health with your MDVIP-affiliated physician.

http://health.clevelandclinic.org/2012/06/eggs-and-other-questionable-foods/

In Good Health,
MDVIP

Brad
Feb 23rd, 2015
I here so much about coconut oil being good for cholesterol problems and helping with cardiovascular problems. It is very high in saturated fats but you always here the other fats make it good for you. I see some of the people at the gym that eat this by the spoonful. What is your opinion on this new super food.
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 26th, 2015
Greetings Brad,

Thank you for asking questions that have been on the minds of many lately. There has been so much buzz lately surrounding coconut oil, that it makes it difficult to tell what is true. However, because the hype over using coconut oil is relatively new, it is too early to take a stand on it. There is very little research available and the studies that have been published often have contradicting results. Until more definitive answers are known, we suggest that you rely on olive oil as a heart-healthy fat. If you have other concerns about how cholesterol affects your heart, considering talking to your MDVIP-affiliated physician. On a separate note, you may be interested in drinking coconut water, especially after working out. This article explains more about it – http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/truth-about-coconut-water?page=1

In Good Health,
MDVIP


Susan
Feb 23rd, 2015
There was a specific question about particle size that was not answered. Is there a test to determine the size or type? Is there a remedy?
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 26th, 2015
Greetings Susan,

Thank you for asking about the specific test to determine particle size, as it also may be helpful to your fellow MDVIP members. The VAP® Test measures the cholesterol concentrations in lipoproteins, which are protein particles that shuttle blood fats (lipids) like cholesterol and triglycerides around the body. The cholesterol content and size of various lipoproteins may predict increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Smaller particles are associated with pre-diabetes and insulin resistance.

While there is no remedy per se, you can take a proactive approach. Be sure to work with your MDVIP-affiliated physician to stay current with screenings for cholesterol, blood sugar and triglycerides. Additionally, you should also discuss if medications are appropriate, as well as starting an exercise program. As for your lifestyle, it would be best to eat a healthy diet high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins and heart healthy fats, while limiting white, refined flour, white sugar, trans fats and unhealthy saturated fat. Furthermore, avoid tobacco products and get between seven and eight hours of sleep each night.

In Good Health,
MDVIP

Marilyn Miller
Feb 23rd, 2015
I think that the biggest risk for heart disease is heredity. I come from an ancestry that was riddled with heart disease. I have heart disease and so does my younger brother. And when my father was first diagnosed with heart disease he gave up foods that he loved in an attempt to control his heart disease. It made no difference. He died of a massive heart attack anyway. I believe that one just cannot overcome heredity.
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 26th, 2015
Greetings Marilyn,

Thank you for writing in about heart disease and heredity. First, we’re sorry for the loss of your father. We agree with you that hereditary is an extremely important risk factor in any disease, including cardiovascular health. Fortunately, studies suggest that many people are able to reduce their risk of developing and/or control the progression of heart disease through lifestyle behaviors like eating a heart-healthy diet, exercising regularly, getting adequate sleep, controlling weight, managing stress, avoiding tobacco products and taking medications as prescribed by your doctor. Your concern that your genetics may outweigh your lifestyle behaviors is justified and all the more reason to work closely with your MDVIP-affiliated physician to stay current with your annual wellness exam and if necessary, our heart health panel to make sure you receive timely treatment.

In Good Health,
MDVIP

Ted
Feb 23rd, 2015
What an unfortunate set of myths about myths. The immune system is a bulwark against invaders. We need a better understanding of how to promote and support the immune system - not how to defend against it.
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 26th, 2015
Greetings Ted,

We agree with you that the immune system is a bulwark against invaders. However, because blogs are brief in nature, we like to focus on one topic, which in this case was three commonly misunderstood factors about heart disease prevention. If you are interested in immunity, we usually cover at least some aspect every year. Included below is a link to our October 2013 Living Well article that covered immune-boosting tactics.

http://www.mdvip.com/living-well/maintain-immunity/?utm_source=mdvipmember&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=octoberlivingw

In Good Health,
MDVIP


joanie joanie
Feb 21st, 2015
Concerns over "inflammation" response to heart disease is a new twist on this ever-changing discourse on prevention of this problem. Plus the part stress plays. Thanks for sharing.
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 26th, 2015
Greetings Joanie,

Thank you for taking time to contribute to the conversation. We agree with you that heart disease prevention and control seems ever-changing. And since stress wreaks havoc on our health, it does have a role in heart disease. We appreciate your feedback.

In Good Health,
MDVIP


Mary Reiner
Feb 21st, 2015
I wonder on MDVIP view of the EndoPat test, would it ever be included in the wellness exam? Is it more valuable for women?
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 26th, 2015
Greetings Mary,

Thank you for your questions about the EndoPAT test. We value the feedback and suggestions regarding the MDVIP Annual Wellness Program as we continuously look to add innovative tests. Currently, there are no plans to include the EndoPAT, however, we will consider this and other tests as we explore future innovations.

In Good Health,
MDVIP


Josephine Cruz
Feb 21st, 2015
I enjoyed every word, and do lead a healthy lifestyle for a 92 year old
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 26th, 2015
Greetings Josephine,

We appreciate hearing how much you enjoyed our article. Thank you for replying. However, we would love to hear some of your wise advice that has allowed you to remain healthy and well into your 90s. Could you please share some of your lifestyle suggestions with your fellow MDVIP members?

In Good Health,
MDVIP
Neal R
Feb 20th, 2015
For someone like me who already has CAD, but with good cholesterol numbers,what are the dietary recommendations and/or restrictions?
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 26th, 2015
Greetings Neal,

Thank you for asking a question that undoubtedly affects your fellow MDVIP members, as well. Unfortunately, recommendations from the Dietary Guidelines Committee, which are currently under review, do not emphasize the importance of limiting your cholesterol intake. The best thing for you to do would be to consult with your MDVIP-affiliated physician regarding your specific diet and medications.

In Good Health,
MDVIP

Barbara Kahle
Feb 20th, 2015
Found this information very interesting
ned
Feb 20th, 2015
This comment is in response to an earlier MDVIP email about he 5 food ingredients to avoid. It cited carrageenan (a seaweed additive to many food products for thickening) as a food to avoid. Checking labels I have found carrageenan to be in many food items including food labeled organic. Online sources say this ingredient is safe and approved by the FDA. What should I believe?
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 20th, 2015
Greetings Ned,

Thank you for your questions about carrageenan. Food producers seem to make labels very confusing, so we understand your concern about what is correct about this thickener. We believe the Food and Drug Administration does their best to protect the health and safety of Americans. However, as research evolves and scientists learn more about food additives, the FDA may be inclined to change their position. I’ve included an FDA review of Carrageenan that was originally written in 1973, then updated in 2006. I’ve also included an article from the Washington Post that explains how the level of scrutiny the FDA has changed in the wake of the explosion of food additives. Lastly, there is a balanced article on carrageenan from Today’s Dietician that may help you decide whether you want to avoid, limit or still eat food products with carrageenan added to them.

In Good Health,
MDVIP

http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/fcn/fcnDetailNavigation.cfm?rpt=scogslisting&id=76
http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/food-additives-on-the-rise-as-fda-scrutiny-wanes/2014/08/17/828e9bf8-1cb2-11e4-ab7b-696c295ddfd1_story.html
http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/070113p16.shtml


Andrew DePristo
Feb 19th, 2015
There are too many statements without references. For example, "And saturated fats are certainly better for you than processed or chemically engineered fats like Trans fats or even many low-fat products available." Where is the comparison of saturated fats versus low-fat products? I would like a reference. The statement "Studies suggest that inflammation is a primary culprit in cardiovascular disease" begs for authoritative references as my reading of the literature indicates this is really a hypothesis supported by nice cartoon figures of inflamed arteries forming clots. But, are there studies really identifying inflammation separate from sedentary lifestyle, eating processed foods, smoking, etc.

I await definitive scientific references containing either double blind controlled studies or large epidemiological analysis.
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 20th, 2015
Greetings Andrew

Thank you for your questions and observations about studies and references. We agree with you that most of the recent information on inflammation that is available online is educational as opposed to scientific. However, this is because researchers found the link between inflammation and disease just about a decade ago. Over the last several years, the focus has been on communicating this information to the public. Concerning foods with saturated fats, our point of view is that whole foods are healthier than processed foods, often made with trans fats. Lastly, as for processed low-fat foods, our position is that whole foods that contain healthy fats are healthier than processed low-fat foods, which are often loaded with sugars, fillers, preservatives and artificial flavors. We’ve included links to informational articles and studies about all of the points we’ve addressed. We hope these have helped. Remember, any questions about your specific health concerns can always be discussed with your MDVIP-affiliated physician.

In Good Health,
MDVIP

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/HealthyEating/Trans-Fats_UCM_301120_Article.jsp
http://www.webmd.com/diet/low-fat-diet
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/248423.php
http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Inflammation-and-Heart-Disease_UCM_432150_Article.jsp
http://www.pnas.org/content/109/16/5995
http://www.health.harvard.edu/family_health_guide/what-you-eat-can-fuel-or-cool-inflammation-a-key-driver-of-heart-disease-diabetes-and-other-chronic-conditions
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/109/21_suppl_1/II-2.full


Jean Welch
Feb 19th, 2015
why don't the yearly Wellness exams include testing for small-particle versus large-particle cholesterol and for C-reactive protein. Or do they?
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 26th, 2015
Greetings Jean,

Thank you for your questions about specific cholesterol tests. MDVIP-affiliated doctors are able to select a panel of blood work that corresponds with a patient’s needs. For instance, we have a panel that focuses on cardiovascular risk and other health conditions. This particular panel includes tests for cholesterol particle size and C-reactive protein. On your next visit with your MDVIP-affiliated physician, ask which panel of tests is most appropriate for your specific health conditions.

In Good Health,
MDVIP

pjsincalab
Feb 19th, 2015
Good summary, but no mention of the pro-inflammatory effects of Omega-6 fatty acids found in soybean, corn, sunflower, cottonseed, and peanut oils? These oils are cheap and ubiquitous in the American diet.
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 20th, 2015
Greetings Patrick,

Thank you for asking about omega-6 fatty acids. You raised very good points about how common they are in preparing food in this country and their health implications. While they seem like they should be healthy because they occur naturally in nutritious foods like nuts and seeds, they can be dangerous because they increase inflammation, as you mentioned. Omega-6 fatty acids are often used to fry foods, which is one reason fried foods, along with refined, white flour products and foods high in sugar seem to provoke an inflammatory response. Thank you for adding to the conversation.

In Good Health,
MDVIP
Sue Emberton
Feb 19th, 2015
What about the issue of LDL particle number?
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 20th, 2015
Greetings Sue,

Thank you for asking a question about LDL, officially referred to as low-density lipoprotein and more commonly called ‘bad cholesterol’. We’re actually not discounting the significance of your LDL particle number nor the importance of working with your doctor to keep your number in a safe range. We’re just trying to shed some light on particle size, which is often overlooked and can cause more concern than the particle number. If your LDL particle number is concerning to you, please consult with your MDVIP-affiliated physician.

In Good Health,
MDVIP


Tom Corr
Feb 19th, 2015
Interesting
Kay Keglovits
Feb 19th, 2015
Need info on PAD
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 19th, 2015
Greetings Kay,

Thank you for asking about PAD, officially called peripheral artery disease. PAD is a common circulatory condition where the arteries narrow due to plaque buildup, often causing cramping in the lower extremities during exercise or activity. But just because it’s common, doesn’t mean that it’s not serious – because it can be. After reading these two excellent articles from our Medical Centers of Excellence Mayo Clinic and Cleveland Clinic, you might want to consider discussing the condition with your MDVIP-affiliated physician.

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/peripheral-artery-disease/basics/definition/con-20028731
http://my.clevelandclinic.org/services/heart/disorders/pad

In Good Health,
MDVIP


Doc Weathers
Feb 19th, 2015
I'm assuming the two books "Wheat Belly" and "Grain Brain" were the two "studies" that are referenced in this article. I'd like a little more information on MDVIP's response to these books. Many of the "issues" raised by the authors of the books seem to go against the "nutrition advice" most of us have received in the past, both by our doctors and our government. Your comments, please.
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 20th, 2015
Greetings Doc,

Thank you for your questions about recent changes to traditional advice on nutrition. While we did not reference the two books you mentioned, the two studies referenced in the article focused on saturated fat and heart disease. One was from the Annals of Internal Medicine and the other from the American Journal of Nutrition. While we are not supporting these studies, we are pointing out that the findings have gained traction in our society. We continue suggesting a heart-healthy diet as recommended by the American Heart Association. However, from our point of view, you are better off eating healthy foods that may contain saturated fat than relying on foods with processed, chemically engineered fats, such as trans fats. For any concerns about your specific health needs, please consult with your MDVIP-affiliated physician.

In Good Health,
MDVIP

Arnold lieber
Feb 19th, 2015
The article did not really inform me of what I should be doing in my life style to ward off risk of coronary disease. How do I react to the idea that inflammation is so serious a factor in coronary disease? What should I do about that in my healthy lifestyle? I do take a cholesterol lowering drug and my wife is a careful meal preparer and food purchaser.
1 Reply
MDVIP
Feb 20th, 2015
Greetings Arnold,

Thank you for your questions about tips to help reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and live a healthier life. It sounds like you and your wife are already engaging in many healthy habits, including eating nutritious foods – keep up the good work. Here are some particulars about the questions you asked.

Since heart disease is our country’s leading cause of death, there are always new studies being published to help Americans understand the best approaches to prevention. Two recent studies suggested that consuming saturated fat is not a risk factor for coronary artery disease. In the blog, we continue promoting a heart-healthy diet as recommended by the American Heart Association. However, from our point of view, you are better off eating healthy foods that may contain a moderate amount of saturated fat than relying on foods with processed, chemically engineered fats, such as trans fats.

As for preventing inflammation, it is important to maintain your immune system by limiting foods that seem to have an inflammatory response, such as fried foods, or those with high amounts of refined white flour or sugar. You can also boost your immune system by sleeping an adequate amount each night, exercising regularly, eating a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables, avoiding tobacco products and managing your stress.

Cholesterol is a little more complicated because watching what you eat can help control cholesterol level, as opposed to specific particle size. It’s best to work with your MDVIP-affiliated physician to help you stay current with screenings and tests for heart disease.

We hope these tips help you enjoy a healthier life.

In Good Health,
MDVIP


Jane Kilgroe
Feb 18th, 2015
This was very informative and I learned a great deal since my husband has heart disease and I have heart disease in my family. I appreciate this information. I will continue to read everything that you send me. Thank you.
1 Reply
Kurt
Feb 18th, 2015
Greetings Jane,

Thank you for being such an avid reader and for sharing your personal connection with heart disease. With cardiovascular disease being the #1 cause of death in our country, we're committed to sharing the most up-to-date information to help our members, like you Jane. Whether it be articles about nutrition, exercise or latest developments, we're doing what we can to help you live a healthier life.

In Good Health,
MDVIP
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