Future Probiotic Pill May Be Able to Treat And Possibly Cure Diabetes

Diabetes is a complicated disease affecting 29.1 million Americans, according to the American Diabetes Association. The ADA also reports that 8.1 million people are living with the disease but are undiagnosed, and another 86 million have been diagnosed with prediabetes. Diabetes can lead to a host of complications, including cardiovascular disease, blindness and kidney disease. Although many people with diabetes are able to maintain their quality of life and control their symptoms through diet, exercise and medication, researchers from Cornell University believe they may have found a new treatment that could lead to curing type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Cornell University scientists manufactured a strain of the probiotic lactobacillus, a type of bacterium naturally found in the digestive, urinary and genital tracts of humans. The purpose was to use the engineered probiotic to trigger a protein-like molecule, known as a peptide, which has the same qualities as glucagon -- a hormone produced in the pancreas that partners with insulin to help regulate blood sugar levels.

After administering the lab-created probiotic to diabetic rats for 90 days, researchers reported:
  • Diabetic rats had up to a 30 percent drop in elevated blood sugar levels.
 
  • The cells lining small intestine converted into cells that behaved similarly to the beta cells of the pancreas. These cells produce and secrete insulin to control blood sugar levels. Beta cells do not function properly in people with diabetes.

  • The manufactured probiotic would shift the responsibility of blood sugar control from the pancreas to the small intestine.
Based on these results, a biopharmaceutical company is working to create a pill form of this probiotic to be taken daily to help people with diabetes regulate their blood sugar. According to Diabetic Connect, Cornell investigators plan to continue their work to test higher doses of the probiotic to see if it can be used to cure, not just treat, diabetes.

Because the manufactured probiotic pill differs from the probiotic products currently available, consuming foods like yogurt, soft cheeses and sourdough bread will not help manage diabetes. Therefore, until the probiotic pill is obtainable through prescription, consider the following tips to prevent and/or control diabetes and some of its complications.
  • If you have been diagnosed with prediabetes or diabetes, follow your prescribed treatment plan, and wear an emergency tag or bracelet.

  • If you have diabetes, prediabetes or are at high risk, visit your MDVIP-affiliated physician and related specialists regularly.

  • Manage your weight. Extra pounds often reduce the sensitivity muscle and fat tissue has to insulin. This is referred to as insulin resistance and it is the most common trigger of type 2 diabetes because it causes the body to require an increasing amount of insulin to control blood sugar.

  • Exercise regularly. Physical activity’s obvious contribution is that it helps manage weight. However, working muscles also burn stored blood sugar and respond better to insulin.

  • Control stress. Cortisol is a stress hormone that typically hits its highpoint in the morning and slowly decreases during the day. By the evening, cortisol levels are supposed to be low.  However, when stressed, more cortisol is released so the body is prepared to handle stress, which is referred to as the “fight or flight” syndrome. The additional cortisol releases sugar into the bloodstream to supply muscles with more energy, which can ultimately lead to increased blood sugar levels.

  • If you smoke, work with your MDVIP-affiliated doctor to help you quit. Some experts believe that nicotine raises blood sugar levels in smokers with diabetes.

  • Regarding alcohol, if you have diabetes, prediabetes or are at high risk for diabetes, consider the following
    • Limiting your alcohol intake to one drink per day for women and two drinks per day for men can help regulate blood sugar levels.
    • Drinking alcohol with meals, as this can help control blood sugar levels, as food can delay the absorption of alcohol.

  • Take care of your feet by washing and moisturizing them daily may help protect the skin from cracking and becoming infected. Consult your MDVIP-affiliated doctor if you notice sores and blisters that do not heal.
If you have diabetes, prediabetes or are at high-risk for developing it, be sure to have a discussion with your MDVIP-affiliated physician. He or she is your best resource to help you manage your blood sugar levels. Further, the unique relationship you share with your MDVIP-affiliated doctor makes it easier to recommend the most effective course of action to help prevent and/control potential complications. Don’t have an MDVIP-affiliated physician? Find one near you by clicking here.
7 Comments
Kim
Apr 8th, 2016
Dr Micheal Monaco is a true doctor that care. I had him for a Dr. many years and moved out of state and lost him almost 1.5 years ago. I truly miss him and am grateful for all the years he helped me. His staff was the best.
1 Reply
MDVIP
Apr 8th, 2016
Greetings Kim,

Thank you for your kind words regarding Dr. Monaco. We’re sorry to read that you moved out of the area and had to find another doctor. We agree with you that Dr. Monaco is a physician that truly cares about his patients. Take care.

In Good Health,
MDVIP

Mike Schwartz
Nov 30th, 2015
This sounds like an encouraging development!
Philip R. Gentile
Nov 18th, 2015
I've had multiple sclerosis for about 25yrs. & expert MS
Neuro Dr now retired say he's never seen MS depart. Wow!
Why does system stomach feel poor? MRI say (3-6yrs) I'm still very clean & no activity. How return normal ???
1 Reply
MDVIP
Nov 19th, 2015
Greetings Philip,

Over time, medications for MS have improved, reducing the number of relapses and slowing the progression of the disease in some patients. However, we are not aware that MS can be cured at this time. As for your GI issues, it is really best to work directly with your physician.

In Good Health,
MDVIP
Raymond Wayne Davis
Nov 13th, 2015
Well done;gives me a feeling of trust and confidence. John Valade is the best angel from God!
1 Reply
MDVIP
Nov 13th, 2015
Greetings John,

We’re glad to read that you appreciate Dr. Valade’s care and that you can relax with a feeling of trust and confidence.

In Good Health,
MDVIP


JoAnn Lindsey
Nov 13th, 2015
This is good information. I don't have diabetes, but my sister who is 89 has type 2 and my father had type 2. Is there a probiotic that I could start taking to help prevent getting the disease? I walk two miles on a treadmill 2-3 days a week (sometimes more, sometimes less). I don't have a weight problem, but my diet is just fair.
1 Reply
MDVIP
Nov 13th, 2015
Greetings JoAnn,

Unfortunately, no. Researchers have found that the probiotics currently available, whether found in food or supplements, do not help diabetes. Our suggestion to you is to work with your doctor to monitor your blood sugar levels, help manage your weight and advise you on nutrition and physical activity.

In Good Health,
MDVIP


Harry
Nov 12th, 2015
Very nice work, but I think it's rather misleading to present such early research results so strongly. It can take 5 to 15 YEARS for promising drugs to go through all the phases of clinical testing in people -- that is, if the drug actually shows any benefit in humans. So as nice as these findings are, most people with diabetes now will not benefit from them.
1 Reply
MDVIP
Nov 12th, 2015
Greetings Harry

Thank you for taking time to share your feedback. Yes, you’re correct, people currently living with diabetes might not benefit from this in the immediate future. However, our goal is to share the latest developments regarding diabetes and other conditions. Isn’t it exciting that within a decade, a new approach to treating diabetes might be available. And, if researchers’ hunches are correct, physicians might be able to cure their patients of diabetes using an increased dosage of this probiotic.

In Good Health,
MDVIP

Sammy
Nov 11th, 2015
Read
Leave Blog Comment