Depression in Men Looks Different than It Does in Women

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
April 10, 2022

Depression is often thought of as a women’s health issue. Women are almost twice as likely as men to experience symptoms of depression, according to the Office on Women’s Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 

But the truth is: Depression also affects men and in large numbers — about six million American men struggle with depression. Unfortunately, they’re less likely to address their depression than women. 


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Lean Body Mass Can Help Forestall Osteoporosis, Particularly in Men

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
April 9, 2022

Most men aren’t too concerned about their own bone density. Understandably so. Bone thinning affects far more women than men. Take hips for example. Hip osteopenia is prevalent in 56 percent of women and 18 percent of men and hip osteoporosis affects 16 percent of women and 2 percent of men, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Medicine Research


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How to Prevent Osteoporosis / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / May 3, 2021
Osteoporosis: What You Need to Know / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / April 16, 2021
Researchers Identify 3 New Osteoporosis Risk Factors / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / April 20, 2015

About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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There’s So Much More to Heart Disease than Just Cholesterol Numbers

Alan Reisinger, Author
By A. Alan Reisinger, III, MD, FACP
March 31, 2022

The year I graduated from medical school, 1982, a brave new world of cardiology was just beginning. Researchers conducting a trial of the drug lovastatin discovered it lowered cholesterol in a small group of patients with a genetic predisposition for dangerously high cholesterol. Patients with this condition were at substantial risk of stroke and heart attack and often died from these cardiovascular events at an early age.


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About the Author
Alan Reisinger, Author
A. Alan Reisinger, III, MD, FACP

Dr. Reisinger is MDVIP’s Associate Medical Director. He practiced for 35+ years as a board-certified internal medicine specialist with a heart for people, a focus on prevention and a desire to see primary care delivered the way it was intended. Serving as a member and subsequent chairman of MDVIP’s medical advisory board, he has helped to lead the clinical direction of the organization since 2008 and has been a passionate advocate for aggressive cardiovascular prevention in our network.

Previously, Dr. Reisinger was on the medical advisory board for Cleveland HeartLab and currently is a member of the BaleDoneen Academy, a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, a member of the American Society for Preventive Cardiology and an advisory board member of the American Academy for Oral Systemic Health.

Integral to his calling is his commitment to improving patient care, and he is resolute in the need to foster enhanced collaboration between the medical and dental communities. He has lectured nationally on cardiovascular disease prevention. Dr. Reisinger has embraced the mission of changing the outcome of CVD, the leading cause of death in the world… “because we can.”

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Bad Teeth & Heart Disease

Alan Reisinger, Author
By A. Alan Reisinger, III, MD, FACP
March 29, 2022

Do you see your dentist regularly?

If you do, good for you. Unfortunately, only about two-thirds of Americans have seen their dentists in the last 12 months. That’s bad for their teeth, and it may also be bad for their heart. That’s because there’s a link between what’s going on in your mouth and what’s going on with your heart. We’ve known for a while that if you have periodontal disease, a common infection that leads to swollen, red and tender gums, you are 49 percent more likely to have a heart attack.


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About the Author
Alan Reisinger, Author
A. Alan Reisinger, III, MD, FACP

Dr. Reisinger is MDVIP’s Associate Medical Director. He practiced for 35+ years as a board-certified internal medicine specialist with a heart for people, a focus on prevention and a desire to see primary care delivered the way it was intended. Serving as a member and subsequent chairman of MDVIP’s medical advisory board, he has helped to lead the clinical direction of the organization since 2008 and has been a passionate advocate for aggressive cardiovascular prevention in our network.

Previously, Dr. Reisinger was on the medical advisory board for Cleveland HeartLab and currently is a member of the BaleDoneen Academy, a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, a member of the American Society for Preventive Cardiology and an advisory board member of the American Academy for Oral Systemic Health.

Integral to his calling is his commitment to improving patient care, and he is resolute in the need to foster enhanced collaboration between the medical and dental communities. He has lectured nationally on cardiovascular disease prevention. Dr. Reisinger has embraced the mission of changing the outcome of CVD, the leading cause of death in the world… “because we can.”

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How Preventive Care Reduces Healthcare Costs

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
March 29, 2022

For centuries, doctors and public health officials have pointed to Ben Franklin’s famous mantra, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Can you really save money by preventing disease?


About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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How to Improve Communications with Your Primary Care Doctor

Dr. Andrea Klemes, Chief Medical Officer MDVIP
By Dr. Andrea Klemes , MDVIP
March 28, 2022

When the doctor-patient relationship works, patients experience better health outcomes. Research shows when patients are happier and reassured, they understand their health challenges and available treatments, and are more likely to adhere to doctors’ orders.


About the Author
Dr. Andrea Klemes, Chief Medical Officer MDVIP
Dr. Andrea Klemes, MDVIP

Dr. Andrea Klemes is the Chief Medical Officer of MDVIP. She also serves as the executive and organizational leader of MDVIP’s Medical Advisory Board that supports quality and innovation in the delivery of the healthcare model drawing expertise from the affiliated physicians. Dr. Klemes oversees MDVIP’s impressive outcomes data and research including hospital utilization and readmission statistics, quality of disease management in the MDVIP network and the ability to identify high-risk patients and intervene early. She is instrumental in the adoption of the Electronic Health Record use in MDVIP-affiliated practices and the creation of the data warehouse. Dr. Klemes is board certified in internal medicine and endocrinology and a fellow of the American College of Endocrinology. Dr. Klemes received her medical degree from the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. She completed an internal medicine residency at Cabrini Medical Center in Manhattan, New York and an Endocrine and Metabolism Fellowship at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta. Prior to joining MDVIP, Dr. Klemes worked at Procter & Gamble in the areas of personal healthcare, women’s health and digestive wellness and served as North American Medical Director for bone health. She spent 10 years in private practice specializing in endocrinology and metabolism in Tallahassee, Florida. In addition, Dr. Klemes held leadership roles with the American Medical Association, Florida Medical Association and as Medical Director of the Diabetes Center in Tallahassee and Panama City, Florida, as well as Chief of the Department of Medicine at Tallahassee Community Hospital. She has been a consultant and frequent lecturer and has completed broad clinical research in diabetes and osteoporosis and published extensively.

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Five Misunderstood Facts About Metabolism

We think we know a lot about weight management and our metabolism. But there’s a surprising number of misconceptions about both — and that can make it harder for us to stay healthy as we age. Here are five misunderstood facts about your metabolism.

 


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Struggling with Your Weight? Cut Ultra-Processed Foods from Your Diet / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / June 12, 2019

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How Does Your Metabolism Work?

You probably hear a lot about your metabolism. From late night TV commercials to internet ads, the world is awash in solutions to speed up your metabolism. But what exactly is our metabolism and what role does it play in our health?

What is Metabolism?

Metabolism is the chemical process where nutrients are converted into energy or calories. It’s one of the most essential processes in our body. 


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Junk Food Cravings, Weight Gain Associated with Sleep Deprivation / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / November 18, 2019
How Your Gut Biome Can Affect Your Weight / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / June 8, 2018

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Gluten May Not Be A Trigger For Your IBS

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
March 15, 2022

Irritable bowel syndrome, often known as IBS, is a complex condition that affects the large intestine, causing abdominal pain and digestive issues. It’s believed that the root of IBS is disturbances in gut-brain interactions. Between 10 and 15 percent of Americans live with IBS. It’s difficult to get a specific percentage, as IBS screenings don’t exist. Doctors generally rely on a patient’s symptoms and tests to rule out other diseases to diagnose a case of IBS.


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Simple Steps to Improve Your Gut Health / Louis B Malinow, M.D. / July 11, 2000
4 Tips to Help You Maintain Gut Health While on Antibiotics / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / November 11, 2021

About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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5 Tips to Help Manage Your Mental Health at Work

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
March 14, 2022

Even if you love your job, work can take a toll on your mental health. Commuter traffic, deadlines and technical glitches — even irksome colleagues — are a part of most people’s daily lives and can cause stress, anxiety and depression.

And mental health issues can also impact work performance. For example, unresolved depression has been linked to a 35 percent reduction in productivity and contributes higher rates of absenteeism – adding to work-related stress.


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4 Mental Health Benefits of Gardening / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / September 18, 2020
Primary Care & Mental Health / October 21, 2020

About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

View All Posts By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
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