Pain Relief for an Ailing Healthcare System

Alan Reisinger, Author
By A. Alan Reisinger, III, MD, FACP
February 27, 2024

Here’s one doctor’s prescription for what patients can do to avoid burnout.

Healthcare can be a real headache that’s causing many Americans to avoid going to the doctor -- and that’s not healthy.

An MDVIP/Ipsos survey shows that 1 in 3 Americans are feeling burned out by their interactions with medical providers, and for good reason: 


About the Author
Alan Reisinger, Author
A. Alan Reisinger, III, MD, FACP

Dr. Reisinger is MDVIP’s Associate Medical Director. He practiced for 35+ years as a board-certified internal medicine specialist with a heart for people, a focus on prevention and a desire to see primary care delivered the way it was intended. Serving as a member and subsequent chairman of MDVIP’s medical advisory board, he has helped to lead the clinical direction of the organization since 2008 and has been a passionate advocate for aggressive cardiovascular prevention in our network.

Previously, Dr. Reisinger was on the medical advisory board for Cleveland HeartLab and currently is a member of the BaleDoneen Academy, a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, a member of the American Society for Preventive Cardiology and an advisory board member of the American Academy for Oral Systemic Health.

Integral to his calling is his commitment to improving patient care, and he is resolute in the need to foster enhanced collaboration between the medical and dental communities. He has lectured nationally on cardiovascular disease prevention. Dr. Reisinger has embraced the mission of changing the outcome of CVD, the leading cause of death in the world… “because we can.”

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4 Tips that Help Make Healthy Snacking Easy

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
February 19, 2024

Snacks are a big industry in the U.S. They constitute almost 25 percent of Americans’ calories and account for one-third of daily added sugar, according to a study published in PLOS Global Public Health.


About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Multiple Sclerosis is Becoming a Disease of Older Americans

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
February 18, 2024

About one million Americans live with multiple sclerosis (MS). It’s often considered a younger person’s disease, as diagnoses tend to occur between ages 20 and 40. But you can be diagnosed with MS at any age.

When you’re diagnosed closer to age 50, it’s known as late onset multiple sclerosis or LOMS. Two examples include actresses Christina Applegate (diagnosed at age 49) and Annette Funicello (diagnosed at age 50). And a diagnosis after age 60 it’s considered very late onset MS or VLOMS.


About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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The Four Types of Skin Cancers

Skin cancer occurs when damaged DNA causes abnormal cell mutations to grow indiscriminately and uncontrollably in the epidermis, the outermost skin layer. These cells can rapidly multiply forming malignant, cancerous tumors.

According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays and the intense UV light of tanning beds are the two primary causes of skin cancer. There are four main types:


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How to Keep Your Skin Healthy

There are many skincare beauty products with proven ingredients helpful for fighting age spots, wrinkles, sagging skin, blemishes, skin tone inconsistencies and dull skin – including retinol, vitamin C, peptides, ceramides, retinoids, alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs), hydroquinone and Kojic acid. But when it comes to skin health, beauty only goes skin deep.

To keep your skin in its healthiest condition, these lifestyle choices play an important role.


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Save Your Skin: Why Your Skin Is Important to Your Health

Our skin is our body’s first barrier of defense. It protects us from the elements and keeps potentially harmful disease-causing microbes out while keeping fluids in to prevent dehydration. Skin also helps regulate body temperature through a process called thermoregulation. Near the surface of the skin, small blood vessels called capillaries enlarge when our blood gets too warm to help it cool down.


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Mild Cognitive Impairment Missed by Many Primary Care Offices

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
January 19, 2024

Have you ever misplaced your glasses? Or walked into a room only to forget why? For years, mild forgetfulness was considered a normal part of aging often triggered by being in a noisy environment, dealing with stress or multitasking.


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Study Finds Methotrexate Helps Ease Hand Osteoarthritis Pain

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
January 18, 2024

Methotrexate is an old drug with some seemingly new tricks. For years it has been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and certain cancers as it can slow the immune response and growth of certain cells. However, methotrexate might be the next go-to remedy for hand osteoarthritis, according to a study published in the journal The Lancet.


About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Should You Skip Red Meat? Some Studies Say It’s Not Necessary

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
January 18, 2024

You’re at a sports bar and would like to get something somewhat healthy. Your first instinct may be to order a salad, but surprisingly, you might be better off with a burger. Yes, many burgers are high in saturated fat, sodium and preservatives. And some experts consider eating a lot of red meat to be risky heath behavior.


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Craving a Cheeseburger? Meatless Burgers May Not Be a Healthier Option / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / February 24, 2020

About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

View All Posts By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
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