Stressed Out? Thinking of Your Significant Other May Help Ease Blood Pressure

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian
February 14, 2019

Stress -- you can’t escape it. And it can wreak havoc on blood pressure. Exercise, meditation and hobbies are common, effective stress busters. So is having a social support system of friends and relatives. But if they’re not available, having your significant other present – even if it’s only in your mind – can help keep blood pressure controlled, according to a small study published in Psychophysiology


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Oral Health: The Often-Overlooked Casualty of Stress

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian
February 5, 2019

You’re probably aware of the toll everyday stress takes on your health. Headaches, weight gain, insomnia – the list goes on and on. But you may not realize how stress affects your oral health. People with greater levels of perceived stress report poorer oral health, according to a study published in BMC Oral Health. And poor oral health raises the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes.


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Effects of Stress on Your Body / Janet Tiberian / December 7, 2018
How Stress Causes Premature Skin Aging / Janet Tiberian / February 5, 2019

About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Why My Patients Aren't Having Heart Attacks

A Alan Reisinger III MD FACP
By A Alan Reisinger III MD FACP
January 27, 2019

It has become clear to me, after more than 35 years of medical practice, that the traditional approach to cardiovascular disease is missing the boat. Just look at these dismal statistics:


About the Physician
A Alan Reisinger III MD FACP

I am a board-certified internal medicine doctor with a passion for people, a focus on prevention and a desire to practice medicine the way it was meant to be practiced. As your personal physician, I believe in combining both the art and the science of medicine, and in being relentless in doing what it takes to provide you with the care you deserve. My philosophy of care combines lifestyle change support (e.g., nutrition, exercise, stress management, healthy habits) with advanced tests and screenings aimed at preventing heart disease, stroke and diabetes. I strive to bring you the best of all worlds of healing.

I’ve been practicing personalized primary care as an MDVIP-affiliated physician since 2008, offering same-day or next-day appointments that are unrushed. This preventive healthcare model revolves around the MDVIP Wellness Program, a truly comprehensive yearly assessment of current health and future risks, resulting in a customized plan built around you to help optimize your health and well-being.

My staff works hard to provide a serene, welcoming, healing environment, to inject a little humor when possible and to make you feel like family whenever you call or visit our office.  We look forward to hearing from you.

 

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Five Myths About Heart Disease

Alan Reisinger, MD, Baltimore, MD:
There are some unfortunately well entrenched myths about heart disease.

Myth 1: Cholesterol numbers are the best indicator of heart disease.


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One-Bowl Chocolate Cake

This easy-to-make chocolate cake is dark, moist, rich—and only dirties one bowl! Not quite as easy as boxed cake mixes, but those often contain trans fats. Our simple "from scratch" recipe gives you a home-baked cake with healthful canola oil and whole-wheat flour.

Ingredients


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Chocolate & Nut Butter Bites / December 14, 2018
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Keep Your New Years Resolutions by Strengthening Your Willpower With These 5 Tips

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian
January 21, 2019

Almost half of all Americans make New Year’s resolutions, yet only a small percent actually achieves them. In fact, about 80 percent of resolutions fall by the wayside by February. 

Why do so many people give up? Some experts chalk it up to a lack of motivation. Remedies include setting up a weekly mini-goals and giving yourself rewards  each time you reach a goal. You can also strengthen your willpower.


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Your Doctor Can Help You Control Heart Disease Risk Despite Your Genetics

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian
January 18, 2019

Exercising, eating a healthy diet, getting enough sleep, managing weight, controlling stress and avoiding tobacco can help prevent heart attacks and strokes. But sometimes genetics trump even the healthiest of lifestyles. You can do everything right and still be diagnosed with coronary artery disease a condition that significantly raises your risk for it, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol or type 2 diabetes.


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Swedish Yellow Split Pea Soup with Ham

This yellow split pea soup has fresh ginger to give it a bright flavor. Use the best ham you can find to get the most flavor.
 

Ingredients

    3 cups yellow split peas, (about 1 1/2 pounds)

    4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth

    4 cups water

    2 cups diced yellow onion

    1 cup diced carrot

    1 cup finely diced celery

    8 ounces ham, trimmed and diced

    1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger

    1 teaspoon dried marjoram

    Freshly ground pepper, to taste


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Irish Lamb Stew / March 14, 2018
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How Testosterone Levels Affect Men’s and Women’s Health

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian
December 12, 2222

Testosterone is the primary male sex hormone. It’s highly involved in developing sexual characteristics, regulating fertility, building muscle mass, distributing fat and driving libido. But it’s also an important hormone for women – it helps make estrogen, contributes to the growth, maintenance and repair of female reproduction tissue, drives libido and influences follicle stimulating hormone (more commonly known as FSH), an important hormone for reproduction in both genders. Testosterone also produces red blood cells in both men and women.


About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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