Does Medicare Cover Telemedicine?

Medicare coverage for telemedicine visits is relatively new. Traditionally Medicare has paid for such visits in a limited way. But the coronavirus, or COVID-19 pandemic, has changed all of that. Why? Many primary care physicians are using telemedicine appointments in lieu of traditional in-office visits to keep patients, doctors and their staffs safe during this time. This has been valuable to patients 65 and older who are considered to be at higher risk, especially if they have an underlying condition such as COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), heart disease or diabetes.  


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Should I see a Primary Care Doctor or a Specialist?

Many patients wonder when they have a problem whether they should go straight to a specialist or a primary care physician. For example, if you have high blood pressure or high cholesterol, should you seek out a cardiologist? What about type 2 diabetes—do you need to see an endocrinologist? 


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Are You Hungry All the Time? You May Have Low Blood Sugar

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
July 17, 2021

You’re trying to lose weight. But despite your best efforts, it’s not working. One problem is that you’re hungry most of the time, even shortly after eating a meal. Ignoring the hunger will make you feel miserable, while giving in can add hundreds of extra calories. You’re stuck between a rock and a hard place. And of course, you’re probably wondering: Why I am hungry all the time?


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Junk Food Cravings, Weight Gain Associated with Sleep Deprivation / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / November 18, 2019

About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Blood Pressure Diet Credited with Reducing Heart Injury and Strain

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
July 15, 2021

High blood pressure is a major problem in the United States. In fact, close to half of all Americans have it. And while the condition is one of the leading predictors of cardiovascular disease – the leading cause of death in the U.S. – it’s also contributes to kidney problems, vision conditions and sexual dysfunction.


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Having Trouble Controlling Your Blood Pressure? These Tips May Help / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / February 17, 2017
Do You Have High Blood Pressure? Double Check Your Medications / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / June 17, 2021

About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

View All Posts By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
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Study Suggests New Prostate Cancer Screening Is More Accurate than PSAs

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
July 15, 2021

For the last 25 years, doctors have used the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test along with digital rectum exams (DRE) to screen for prostate cancer. This approach, to say the least, has been controversial. 


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Planning a Vacation? Here’s What You Need to Know about Traveling this Summer

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
July 16, 2021

July and August are the traditional peak of the summer travel season. With last year’s travel season hampered by COVID, this summer is proving to be very busy, with crowded airports, national parks and other tourist destinations. But with cases on the rise in certain areas of the U.S. due to the Delta variant, COVID is back on the minds of a lot of travelers. 


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

View All Posts By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
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When To Consider Medication for Anxiety

Anxiety feels terrible. Anti-anxiety medications, also called anxiolytics, can deliver fast relief. So why doesn’t everybody with anxiety take them? 

The short answer, from a treatment perspective: These drugs can do much more to your body than simply turn down the dial on anxious feelings. Anxiolytics have a well-known risk for addiction and potentially harmful side effects – especially as you age. 


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5 Things You Can Do Right Now to Ease Anxiety

Anxiety can be uncomfortable. Physically uncomfortable. An intense episode of anxiety can make you want to crawl out of your skin.

A single episode of anxiety can also affect your personality, bringing out undesirable traits – even if only for a short period. You might burst into tears if your pants don’t fit, or yell at your spouse when there’s family stress. 

Bottom line: Sometimes, you need immediate relief from the tension of high anxiety. You simply can’t imagine waiting until 5 pm for a yoga class, or two days for your therapist’s next available appointment. 


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Why You Shouldn’t Ignore Anxiety

Anxiety affects us all. In some cases, it’s fleeting: a pit your stomach before your doctor delivers test results; sweaty palms before you deliver a presentation. Those are normal responses to stressful situations.

Anxiety may be a problem, however, if it becomes overwhelming or interferes with everyday activities. It may be a problem if it causes you to feel ill, lose your temper, or avoid certain places or people. 


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What You Need to Know About the Coronavirus Variants

Dr. Andrea Klemes, Chief Medical Officer MDVIP
By Dr. Andrea Klemes , MDVIP
June 24, 2021

For most of the last year, scientists haven’t just been focused on the main coronavirus but also newer versions of it. You’ve probably heard about a lot of different variants named for the place where they were first detected like the British or South African variants or given a more clinical designation like the B.1.617.2 strain, which was identified first in India.


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About the Author
Dr. Andrea Klemes, Chief Medical Officer MDVIP
Dr. Andrea Klemes
, MDVIP

Dr. Andrea Klemes is the Chief Medical Officer of MDVIP. She also serves as the executive and organizational leader of MDVIP’s Medical Advisory Board that supports quality and innovation in the delivery of the healthcare model drawing expertise from the affiliated physicians. Dr. Klemes oversees MDVIP’s impressive outcomes data and research including hospital utilization and readmission statistics, quality of disease management in the MDVIP network and the ability to identify high-risk patients and intervene early. She is instrumental in the adoption of the Electronic Health Record use in MDVIP-affiliated practices and the creation of the data warehouse. Dr. Klemes is board certified in internal medicine and endocrinology and a fellow of the American College of Endocrinology. Dr. Klemes received her medical degree from the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. She completed an internal medicine residency at Cabrini Medical Center in Manhattan, New York and an Endocrine and Metabolism Fellowship at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta. Prior to joining MDVIP, Dr. Klemes worked at Procter & Gamble in the areas of personal healthcare, women’s health and digestive wellness and served as North American Medical Director for bone health. She spent 10 years in private practice specializing in endocrinology and metabolism in Tallahassee, Florida. In addition, Dr. Klemes held leadership roles with the American Medical Association, Florida Medical Association and as Medical Director of the Diabetes Center in Tallahassee and Panama City, Florida, as well as Chief of the Department of Medicine at Tallahassee Community Hospital. She has been a consultant and frequent lecturer and has completed broad clinical research in diabetes and osteoporosis and published extensively.

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