New Guidelines Under Consideration for Aspirin and Heart Disease

Dr. Andrea Klemes, Chief Medical Officer MDVIP
By Dr. Andrea Klemes , MDVIP
October 18, 2021

Since the 1980s, doctors have been prescribing aspirin to help prevent heart attacks and strokes, especially in individuals at high risk. But in recent years, studies have shown that aspirin, which is often prescribed because it helps inhibit blood clot formation that can block your arteries, may create other risks especially for people 60 and older.


About the Author
Dr. Andrea Klemes, Chief Medical Officer MDVIP
Dr. Andrea Klemes, MDVIP

Dr. Andrea Klemes is the Chief Medical Officer of MDVIP. She also serves as the executive and organizational leader of MDVIP’s Medical Advisory Board that supports quality and innovation in the delivery of the healthcare model drawing expertise from the affiliated physicians. Dr. Klemes oversees MDVIP’s impressive outcomes data and research including hospital utilization and readmission statistics, quality of disease management in the MDVIP network and the ability to identify high-risk patients and intervene early. She is instrumental in the adoption of the Electronic Health Record use in MDVIP-affiliated practices and the creation of the data warehouse. Dr. Klemes is board certified in internal medicine and endocrinology and a fellow of the American College of Endocrinology. Dr. Klemes received her medical degree from the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. She completed an internal medicine residency at Cabrini Medical Center in Manhattan, New York and an Endocrine and Metabolism Fellowship at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta. Prior to joining MDVIP, Dr. Klemes worked at Procter & Gamble in the areas of personal healthcare, women’s health and digestive wellness and served as North American Medical Director for bone health. She spent 10 years in private practice specializing in endocrinology and metabolism in Tallahassee, Florida. In addition, Dr. Klemes held leadership roles with the American Medical Association, Florida Medical Association and as Medical Director of the Diabetes Center in Tallahassee and Panama City, Florida, as well as Chief of the Department of Medicine at Tallahassee Community Hospital. She has been a consultant and frequent lecturer and has completed broad clinical research in diabetes and osteoporosis and published extensively.

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Even If You Do Well on Your Heart Health Screenings, You May Have Early-Stage Atherosclerosis

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
October 16, 2021

Chances are, your doctor is already screening you for atherosclerosis risk. They are probably keeping track of your cholesterol, blood pressure and your blood sugar levels. But even if these numbers are perfect, you may still have fatty deposits in your heart arteries, according to a new study. 


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Walnuts Lowers LDL and Possibly CVD Risk

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
October 15, 2021

If you like walnuts, you’re going to go nuts over this: They may help lower your risk for heart disease.

Coronary artery disease, the most common form of cardiovascular disease, when plaque builds up in your arteries. Elevated levels low-density lipoprotein (LDL), also known as bad cholesterol, are a major contributor. 


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Wine, Nuts and Salads: Three Foods that May Help You Maintain Memory / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / March 17, 2018

About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Sadness vs. Depression: What Everyone Should Know

Sad, struggling, down, depressed. These are the words we use to describe our lousy, low moods. We use them interchangeably – and that’s just fine. 

One word that doesn’t belong there: depression. 


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Surprising Signs of Depression as You Age

Would you be able to identify clinical depression in yourself? Could you identify it in a loved one? 

You may think you can. After all, the telltale signs seem pretty hard to miss: ongoing sadness or hopelessness, loss of interest in normal activities, fatigue, sleep problems. 


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COVID-19: Understanding Its Variants

Since late 2019, COVID-19 has been circulating and evolving. It’s infected countless people and claimed an estimated 4.5 million lives — nearly 700,000 in the U.S. Each time a major outbreak tamped down by social distancing, vaccination and other public health efforts, the virus finds a way back – changing so that it evades some of the countermeasures against it. This has led to a number of new strains or variants of the original virus. 


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Should I get a COVID booster shot?

Dr. Andrea Klemes, Chief Medical Officer MDVIP
By Dr. Andrea Klemes , MDVIP
September 23, 2021

By now you’ve probably heard lots about booster shots for the COVID vaccines. In August, the Food and Drug Administration gave emergency authorization for third shots for people with compromised immune systems – patients receiving chemotherapy and transplant recipients, among others. 

At the same time, the White House also announced a plan to begin offering boosters to vaccinated individuals in late September, citing evidence that the vaccines’ effectiveness against infections wanes over time and doesn’t provide as much protection against the Delta variant. 


About the Author
Dr. Andrea Klemes, Chief Medical Officer MDVIP
Dr. Andrea Klemes, MDVIP

Dr. Andrea Klemes is the Chief Medical Officer of MDVIP. She also serves as the executive and organizational leader of MDVIP’s Medical Advisory Board that supports quality and innovation in the delivery of the healthcare model drawing expertise from the affiliated physicians. Dr. Klemes oversees MDVIP’s impressive outcomes data and research including hospital utilization and readmission statistics, quality of disease management in the MDVIP network and the ability to identify high-risk patients and intervene early. She is instrumental in the adoption of the Electronic Health Record use in MDVIP-affiliated practices and the creation of the data warehouse. Dr. Klemes is board certified in internal medicine and endocrinology and a fellow of the American College of Endocrinology. Dr. Klemes received her medical degree from the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. She completed an internal medicine residency at Cabrini Medical Center in Manhattan, New York and an Endocrine and Metabolism Fellowship at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta. Prior to joining MDVIP, Dr. Klemes worked at Procter & Gamble in the areas of personal healthcare, women’s health and digestive wellness and served as North American Medical Director for bone health. She spent 10 years in private practice specializing in endocrinology and metabolism in Tallahassee, Florida. In addition, Dr. Klemes held leadership roles with the American Medical Association, Florida Medical Association and as Medical Director of the Diabetes Center in Tallahassee and Panama City, Florida, as well as Chief of the Department of Medicine at Tallahassee Community Hospital. She has been a consultant and frequent lecturer and has completed broad clinical research in diabetes and osteoporosis and published extensively.

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Updated Type 2 Diabetes Screening Guidelines

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
September 17, 2021

Type 2 diabetes has been an epidemic in the U.S. for more than a decade — 13 percent of American adults have diabetes and almost 35 percent are considered prediabetic, according to JAMA. Type 2 diabetes is more common in older adults -- the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. -- and raises the risk for heart disease, kidney failure, blindness, nonalcoholic liver diseases, falls, urinary incontinence, dementia, depression and hearing loss. 


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Flu Season 2021: What to Expect Amongst Covid

Since early 2020, COVID-19 has been the center of attention. However, as fall approaches, you’ll hear more and more about the flu.

When Does Flu Season Start?

Flu season typically starts in November and runs through March, but it can start as early as October and last through May. 

“Influenza is a serious virus, responsible for many hospitalizations and deaths every year,” says Bernard Kaminetsky, MD, medical director, MDVIP. “Last year’s season was quiet; however, experts are concerned that this year will be tough.”


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Gene Variants Involved in Serious COVID-19 Complications, Study

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
September 17, 2021

COVID-19 is still a relatively new, and scientists learn more about it every day. For example, your DNA may affect how vulnerable you are to contracting a COVID-19 infection and how severe that infection may be, according to a study published in Nature


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

View All Posts By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
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