Tips for getting more sleep

Try the following tips to help you get seven to eight hours of sleep each night.

Get at least 30 minutes of aerobic activity several times a week at least four hours before bedtime.

Limit alcoholic beverages throughout the day and avoid them after 5 pm. Alcohol interferes with sleeping.

Avoid caffeinated beverages and foods like tea, coffee, cola and chocolate, particularly after 4 pm.


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Hate Exercise? This New Fitness Trend Might Be for You

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian
July 17, 2019

A new trend in physical activity is quickly gaining popularity -- high-intensity interval physical activity (HIIPA). It’s based on the high-intensity interval training (HIIT) method and could be a way for you to get the benefits of intense training without the risks or even working out.


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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5 Tips to Survive Hot Summer Workouts

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian
July 18, 2019

It’s mid-summer, 90 degrees and humid, but you want to work out and you prefer doing it outdoors. Treadmills really aren’t your thing – you feel like a hamster walking or running on one. 

You’re probably aware summer heat raises your risk for sunburn, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke, so it’s important to talk to you doctor before you work out in high temperatures. If you get clearance, there are strategies that can help make summer workouts more enjoyable. Try these five tips.   


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Can Summer Trigger Migraines? / Janet Tiberian / August 14, 2016

About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

View All Posts By Janet Tiberian
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The Future of Skin Cancer Detection Seems to Be Improving

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian
July 19, 2019

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. Each year more than 5.4 million cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer are treated in more than 3.3 million people, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. Close to 100,000 cases of melanoma — the most dangerous form — will be diagnosed in 2019.


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

View All Posts By Janet Tiberian
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8 Things You Need to Tell Your Doctor

Here are eight things your doc absolutely needs to know, as they can indicate some pretty serious—even life-threatening—conditions that may need to be ruled out with tests, considered when issues occur down the line, or at the very least impact your ongoing overall health and wellbeing.


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Embarrassing but Crucial Symptoms Doctors Wish You’d Tell Them That Many Patients Don’t

There are very few people except seven- or eight-year-old boys who enjoy and feel confident talking openly about embarrassing health issues without squirming, cringing and feeling super nervous. But when it comes to your health, you need to get comfortable in doing so in the confidential space of your doctor’s office. Here’s what your doctor wants and needs to know about:


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Why and How to be Fully Transparent with Your Physician

If doctors could wave a magic wand, they would ideally know everything about you. But we all know that’s difficult-to-impossible to do in a world of infrequent appointments that are typically only 10 minutes long or less. As an MDVIP patient, you have the luxury of long appointments (averaging 45 minutes), during which your physician can really dig in to learn all about you—your health, your lifestyle, your family and relationships, that all contribute to the matrix of your health. 


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Struggling with Your Weight? Cut Ultra-Processed Foods from Your Diet

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian
June 12, 2019

You’ve heard it many times: limit your intake of highly processed foods. You know the fast, ready-to-eat convenient foods with a long list of hard to pronounce ingredients. Some are easy to recognize -- soft drinks (including diet soda), fast food menu items and packaged baked goods, to name a few. However, some of these so called “ultra-processed” foods, like energy bars, flavored yogurt and breakfast cereals are marketed as health foods. 


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Like Walking? Here’s How to Become a Runner

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian
June 15, 2019

Walking is arguably one of the easiest, most effective forms of exercise. It’s relatively inexpensive -- all you really need is a good pair of walking shoes. And you can walk pretty much anywhere. But sometimes even the most dedicated walker needs more of a challenge than walking (or even power or race walking) or wants to burn fat and calories more efficiently. If this sounds like you, maybe your next step is running.


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

View All Posts By Janet Tiberian
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What Happens During a Heart Attack

The term “heart attack” is kind of a misnomer. Nothing actually attacks your heart. So, what really happens during a heart attack? 

In a nutshell, a coronary artery becomes blocked. This prevents blood from flowing to the heart, and as a result your heart muscle is damaged. 

The medical term is myocardial infarction. "Myo" means muscle. "Cardial" refers to the heart. "Infarction" means tissue death due to lack of blood supply. Myocardial infarction and heart attack mean the same thing. 


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Lower Inflammation to Reduce Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke / Dr. Andrea Klemes / February 14, 2018
Why My Patients Aren't Having Heart Attacks / A Alan Reisinger III MD FACP / January 27, 2019

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